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Accepted Abstracts

#1

PRELIMINARY RESULTS FROM A RANDOMIZED, SHAM- CONTROL, DOUBLE BLIND, CROSS-OVER TRIAL OF SUB- THRESHOLD SPINAL CORD STIMULATION AT VARIOUS KILOHERTZ FREQUENCIES (SCS FREQUENCY STUDY)

Authors

Adnan Al-Kaisy M.D., Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospital NHS Trust London; Stefano Palmisani M.D., Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospital NHS Trust, London; Karen Sanderson R.N., Guy’s and St. Thomas’ Hospital NHS Trust, London; Ye Tan, Department of Clinical Research, Medtronic Neuromodulation; Sheryl McCammon, Department of Clinical Research, Medtronic Neuromodulation

Synopsis

Preliminary results from a randomized, sham-control, double blind, cross- over trial of sub-threshold spinal cord stimulation at various kilohertz frequencies (SCS Frequency Study).

The SCS Frequency Study is a prospective, randomized, double blind, sham- controlled, cross-over study to evaluate the safety and e cacy of SCS using sub-perceptual threshold amplitude levels at 4 di erent frequencies in individuals diagnosed with FBSS who respond to conventional SCS settings. Sub-perception stimulation was delivered at 1200Hz, at 3030Hz and at 5882Hz. Each therapy setting signi cantly reduced the VAS back pain scores compared with baseline values, including a sham stimulation setting. The highest frequency setting (5882Hz) was statistically superior to all the other settings. The study also provides new data regarding placebo response and sham e ect in SCS therapy.

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#2

ELECTRICAL STIMULATION OF LACRIMAL GLAND AND ETHMOID NERVE ENHANCE TEAR SECRETION

Authors

Mark Brinton, Stanford University, Department of Electrical Engineering; Andrea Kossler, Stanford University, Department of Ophthalmology;
Jae Lim Chung, Konyang University College of Medicine, Kim’s Eye Hospitial, Ophthalmology; Koung Hoon Kook, Ajou University School of Medicine, Department of Ophthalmology; Zara Patel, Stanford University, Otolaryngology/Head and Neck Surgery; Manfred Franke, Allergan; Jim Loudin, Stanford University, Hansen Experimental Physics Laboratory; Christopher Ta, Stanford University, Department of Ophthalmology; Daniel Palanker, Stanford University, Department of Ophthalmology

Synopsis

Dry eye disease a icts millions of people with irritating and painful symptoms. Electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland or nasal mucosa (anterior ethmoid nerve) may alleviate dry eye syndrome by increasing tear secretion. In rabbits, maximum tearing occurred at pulse frequencies of 50-70Hz and 50% duty cycle. Gland stimulation (e erent pathway) improved tear secretion by 57%; but nasal stimulation (a erent pathway) increased tearing by 147%. A wireless nasal or lacrimal gland stimulator could be used for treatment of dry eye disease.

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